Close to Heart

Posted on February 10 2015

mom and baby - close to heart


The importance of human touch is one we can lose sight on, particularly as we spend more of our communicative moments online, in relationships that span great distances. But the truth is that skin-to-skin contact is as vitally nourishing as the food we eat and the clothes we wear.

Your skin is the largest organ in your body. It helps protect you from the elements; without it you would be exposed, raw, and immensely vulnerable. Your skin helps you regulate body temperature, a critical component in keeping your heart beating regularly, pumping blood to all the other important parts of your body.  Your skin is smart, and tough, and healing, and warm, and when your skin touches the brand new skin of your precious baby, the nourishment it provides is wondrous. Studies have shown that skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth, with baby placed naked on your chest, has the following positive effects:

  • stabilizes baby’s body temperature
  • regulates baby’s breathing and heart rate
  • elevates baby’s blood sugar
  • improves the breastfeeding relationship by making latching easier
  • reduces crying

With skin-to-skin contact that continues beyond the moments right after birth, these benefits continue as baby is developing. The presence of maternal touch promotes healthy attachment, the absence of which has been linked to self-destructive behavior and social detachment.

Wear your baby. Share in the skin-to-skin contact that your baby craves, in the warmth, closeness and nourishment of close to heart.

Instagram Contest

Share your sweetest close to heart moments with your baby and be entered to win an Almond Blossom Moby Wrap and a dark chocolate teething ring necklace from The Vintage Honey Shop. One winner will be selected on 2/16/15. To enter:

Go to Instagram →
1. Follow @mobywrap and @thevintagehoneyshop
2. Share a photo and tag it #closetoheart 

enter to win a Moby Wrap and teething neclace

#CloseToHeart on Instagram

Further reading:
Harry F. Harlow, “Love in Infant Monkeys,” Scientific American 200 (June 1959)

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